Nordic Cultural Etiquette That Makes Scandinavia Stand Out

Scandinavia refers to a collection of countries namely Denmark, Sweden, and Norway – three countries along the northern European region that has very concrete historical, linguistic and cultural ties.

Nordic Cultural Etiquette That Makes Scandinavia Stand Out

However, from time to time, other countries like Finland, Iceland, or the Faroe Islands are included in that particular group but are usually considered Nordic countries. Not only do Scandinavian countries share and possess such strong rudimentary ties concerning their history and culture but also are recognized as some of the most beautiful countries with majestic natural landscapes, delicacies, and substantial ethical and moral traditional livelihood. Even though groups are prevalent to Scandinavia, they still possess a very distinctive trait in their culture and lifestyle that defines them independently and uniquely. There is some Nordic cultural etiquette that puts the Scandinavian countries on top of the platform of courtesy. These are specific characteristics that generally practice as a way of perpetuating respect, courtesy, and civility. The attributive traits of each country are individually peculiar, yet they have some general similarities amongst the people. The people are friendly, open-minded to social equality; however somewhat reserved yet casual in their approaches, they emphasize modesty and also progressiveness. Their practice of such traits in their culture, make them anticipate, and find comfortability in others with the same approach to these cultural traits. Equality of sexes is very significant to these people. The idea of men and women’s fair treatment within the same social situations is considered a highly reputable etiquette. One of the many plausible attributive traits within their demeanor is the simple way of introducing oneself. Their concept of introduction starts with a proper shaking of hands of all men, including women and children. That is to say, if a couple were to meet a family, they have to make sure every individual in the family gets a handshake. However, not necessarily do the children need to shake the hands of say, other children, especially in a setting of family-family meeting.

It is always a proper etiquette for children upon first introductions to shake hands with the older acquaintances. During the introduction, they are very cautious in maintaining eye-contact as it says a lot about the level of interest and respect during the encounter. At the end of the conversation or upon departure, it is again polite to end with shaking of hands. From the outset, just the introduction itself tells you a lot about how they value their interactions and relationships with others. In addition to that, personal space is considered to be significant, and as a form of polite mannerism, one should not invade the personal space of his acquaintance. As a result, the continuance of such practice all the more applauds their attitude as a whole. In this modern generation, it has become a trend that the good old days of chivalry is no longer existent but not for the Scandinavians. They are generally a very calm and polite race. Those visiting the countries would also fit in better if they can maintain peace and follow the appropriate etiquette to fit in.